1. idon-tevenwantoknow:

    THERE’S TIMES WHEN I WANT A RUSTIC CABIN IN THE WOODS AWAY FROM ALL SOCIETYimage

    THEN THERE’S TIMES WHEN I WANT A MODERN ASS HOUSE image

    THEN I’M LIKE I’LL ACCEPT NOTHING MORE THAN A VICTORIAN MANOR
    image

    THEN I WANT A PENTHOUSE IN THE MIDDLE OF NEW YORK
    image

    THEN I WANT ONE OF THOSE HOUSE MADE OUT SHIPPING CONTAINERSimage

    THEN I WANT A FRENCH CHATEAUimage

    BUT I ALSO WANT A TREE HOUSEimage

    AND FALLINGWATER image

    AND A LITTLE COTTAGE ON THE OCEANimage

    HOUSES ARE SO COOL

    (via notsoscairdycat)

  2. medievalpoc:

    distant-relatives-blog:

     The University of Sankoré, or Sankore Masjid is one of three ancient centers of learning located in TimbuktuMaliWest Africa. The three mosques of Sankoré, Djinguereber Mosque and Sidi Yahya compose the famous University of Timbuktu. During the 14th -16th century, Sankore University enrolled more foreigen students than New York University today. 

    The Mali Empire gained direct control over the city of Timbuktu in 1324 during the reign of Mansa Kankou Musa also known as Musa I “King of Kings”. He designed and saw the construction of one of Sankore’s first great mosques and the Jingeray Ber Masjid in 1327.The foundations of the previous structure were laid around 988 A.D. on the orders of the city’s chief judge Al-Qadi Aqib ibn Mahmud ibn Umar. A local mandinka lady, esteemed for her wealth, financed his plans to turn Sankoré into a world class learning institution. 

    By the end of Mansa Musa’s reign (early 14th century CE), the Sankoré Masjid had been converted into a fully staffed Madrassa (Islamic school or in this case university) with the largest collections of books in Africa since the Library of Alexandria. The level of learning at Timbuktu’s Sankoré University was superior to that of all other Islamic centers in the world. The Sankoré Masjid was capable of housing 25,000 students and had one of the largest libraries in the world with between 400,000 to 700,000 manuscripts.

    Today, the intellectual legacy of Timbuktu is neglected in historical discourse. These pages of WORLD history tend to get ripped out.   

    Learn more about the surviving manuscripts of the library of Timbuktu and its fate here.

  3. blackhaireverywhere:

    crimsong19:

    consultingpiskies:

    Jessica Williams speaks with Sgt. Jasmine Jacobs about Army regulation AR 670-1

    Jessica Williams and Travon (one of the staff writers) do it again!

    This is why white women can’t be in the natural hair movement

    (via jadelyn)

  4. In her research on shelters for women, Mirha-Soleil Ross discovered that the refusal of services to a [trans] woman was justified on the grounds of the “safety” and comfort level of the other women residents. Ross argues that this concern over “safety” does not extend to [trans] women: “If I have fear and concerns for anyone’s safety in a shelter, it is for an isolated [trans] woman, not for a [cis woman] who doesn’t have to prove to anyone that she is a woman.”

    As Ross so eloquently explains, this rationale absolves shelters of their responsibility in educating themselves and their residents about the diversity of women’s lives:

    Even the argument that [trans] women should be excluded for their own safety is not acceptable on a long term basis. Just like any other form of prejudice and discrimination, if some [cis] women are threatening the safety of a [trans] woman because she is [trans], it should be dealt with immediately and efficiently. The [cis] women should be confronted about their own ignorance and violence. I don’t see why [trans] women should be restricted from access to such vital services because of somebody else’s transphobia and hatred.

    Like the policies in homeless youth shelters, the [trans woman] in question is singled out as the “cause” of this “problem,” or the reason [cis] women in the shelter will not feel safe. This focuses attention on the [trans woman] and neglects the real issue at hand: the provision of services to those in need.

    Viviane Namaste, Invisible Lives: The Erasure of Transsexual and Transgendered People (via transfeminism)

    (via jadelyn)

  5. mxtori:

    businessinsider:

    7 QUESTIONS YOU SHOULD ASK AT THE END OF EVERY JOB INTERVIEW.

    Click here to find out why these questions help you.

    This is so important!

    I never know what to ask and end up looking like a fool cause I don’t have a question prepared.

    Don’t be me.

    (via fandomsandwich)

    master post

  6. larrygay:

    inner—utopia:

    Bless that one person in every group that is like “keep going, I’m listening” and encourages you to finish your story even when everyone else is talking over you.

    (via fandomsandwich)

  7. mpreg-tony:

samw1se:

underage-fangirl:

joelayheymanasdicks:

sobsbcyoutubers:

skin-like-snowflakes:

masterdust:

uncannibal:

guccipoop:

Beautiful

I THOUGHT IT WAS SO FLOWY AND COOL AND SO ODD LIKE WOW ITS LIKE THE PERFECT SHAPE TO FLOW DOWN AND DROP LIKE THAT AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS A BUNCH OF MINIATURE DICKS SO I WAS JUST„, “OH”

I thought they were peanuts

At first glance I saw jellybeans

I thought they were babies help

I thought it was a human spine…..

The dicks only make it better

WAY TO CUT OFF THE BEST PART OF THE WHOLE GIF



I thought they were baby doll arms too.

    mpreg-tony:

    samw1se:

    underage-fangirl:

    joelayheymanasdicks:

    sobsbcyoutubers:

    skin-like-snowflakes:

    masterdust:

    uncannibal:

    guccipoop:

    Beautiful

    I THOUGHT IT WAS SO FLOWY AND COOL AND SO ODD LIKE WOW ITS LIKE THE PERFECT SHAPE TO FLOW DOWN AND DROP LIKE THAT AND THEN I REALIZED IT WAS A BUNCH OF MINIATURE DICKS SO I WAS JUST„, “OH”

    I thought they were peanuts

    At first glance I saw jellybeans

    I thought they were babies help

    I thought it was a human spine…..

    The dicks only make it better

    WAY TO CUT OFF THE BEST PART OF THE WHOLE GIF

    I thought they were baby doll arms too.

    (Source: nutnics, via fandomsandwich)

    hilarious

  8. amaditalks:

brigidkeely:


They call us now. Before they drop the bombs. The phone rings and someone who knows my first name calls and says in perfect Arabic “This is David.” And in my stupor of sonic booms and glass shattering symphonies still smashing around in my head I think “Do I know any Davids in Gaza?” They call us now to say Run. You have 58 seconds from the end of this message. Your house is next. They think of it as some kind of war time courtesy. It doesn’t matter that there is nowhere to run to. It means nothing that the borders are closed and your papers are worthless and mark you only for a life sentence in this prison by the sea and the alleyways are narrow and there are more human lives packed one against the other more than any other place on earth Just run. We aren’t trying to kill you. It doesn’t matter that you can’t call us back to tell us the people we claim to want aren’t in your house that there’s no one here except you and your children who were cheering for Argentina sharing the last loaf of bread for this week counting candles left in case the power goes out. It doesn’t matter that you have children. You live in the wrong place and now is your chance to run to nowhere. It doesn’t matter that 58 seconds isn’t long enough to find your wedding album or your son’s favorite blanket or your daughter’s almost completed college application or your shoes or to gather everyone in the house. It doesn’t matter what you had planned. It doesn’t matter who you are Prove you’re human. Prove you stand on two legs. Run. Running Orders by Lena Khalaf Tuffaha

If I read a dystopian and/or SF book about people who are telephoned and informed to leave their homes before they are destroyed, but who have no place to go, no way of leaving the place they are, i would not believe it because it would be too cartoonishly evil.

And yet.

Imagine getting that call. The call that proves that the “only democracy in the Middle East” the one “constantly under threat” from its enemies is intentionally targeting civilian residences for long range bombing — long range being important because it means that despite the constant allegation that Hamas “hides amongst the people” and puts weapons in civilian homes, no searches are being made. No one knows from miles away in Tel Aviv who or what is in a home. But still the call. Then the bomb. Filled with fletchettes or maybe white phosphorus or maybe just explosive fire destroying another home, another family, another future. Free Palestine.

    amaditalks:

    brigidkeely:

    They call us now.
    Before they drop the bombs.
    The phone rings
    and someone who knows my first name
    calls and says in perfect Arabic
    “This is David.”
    And in my stupor of sonic booms and glass shattering symphonies
    still smashing around in my head
    I think “Do I know any Davids in Gaza?”
    They call us now to say
    Run.
    You have 58 seconds from the end of this message.
    Your house is next.
    They think of it as some kind of war time courtesy.
    It doesn’t matter that
    there is nowhere to run to.
    It means nothing that the borders are closed
    and your papers are worthless
    and mark you only for a life sentence
    in this prison by the sea
    and the alleyways are narrow
    and there are more human lives
    packed one against the other
    more than any other place on earth
    Just run.
    We aren’t trying to kill you.
    It doesn’t matter that
    you can’t call us back to tell us
    the people we claim to want aren’t in your house
    that there’s no one here
    except you and your children
    who were cheering for Argentina
    sharing the last loaf of bread for this week
    counting candles left in case the power goes out.
    It doesn’t matter that you have children.
    You live in the wrong place
    and now is your chance to run
    to nowhere.
    It doesn’t matter
    that 58 seconds isn’t long enough
    to find your wedding album
    or your son’s favorite blanket
    or your daughter’s almost completed college application
    or your shoes
    or to gather everyone in the house.
    It doesn’t matter what you had planned.
    It doesn’t matter who you are
    Prove you’re human.
    Prove you stand on two legs.
    Run.

    Running Orders by Lena Khalaf Tuffaha

    If I read a dystopian and/or SF book about people who are telephoned and informed to leave their homes before they are destroyed, but who have no place to go, no way of leaving the place they are, i would not believe it because it would be too cartoonishly evil.

    And yet.

    Imagine getting that call. The call that proves that the “only democracy in the Middle East” the one “constantly under threat” from its enemies is intentionally targeting civilian residences for long range bombing — long range being important because it means that despite the constant allegation that Hamas “hides amongst the people” and puts weapons in civilian homes, no searches are being made. No one knows from miles away in Tel Aviv who or what is in a home. But still the call. Then the bomb. Filled with fletchettes or maybe white phosphorus or maybe just explosive fire destroying another home, another family, another future.

    Free Palestine.

    (Source: lilightfoot, via jadelyn)

  9. enochliew:

    700 year-old Stone Houses in Iran

    (Source: slightlywarped.com, via notsoscairdycat)

  10. “Why is femslash the smallest genre in the world of fanfiction? Why is femslash the most underrepresented relationship type by a sizeable margin? More importantly, why is it that almost all femslash writers are queer women? Male slash pairings are written by straight women, queer women, and even some men (I say “even” because men are rarer than a two dollar bill in the world of fanfiction) and they’re read by a mostly female audience. Femslash has a completely different ideology, because it’s almost exclusively written and consumed by the community it portrays. Unlike a straight girl writing about two boys having sex (and I guarantee that they’re two conventionally attractive white boys whose female love interests have been deemed either worthy of death or asexual by the fandom), femslash is written by those whose identities and personal narratives are reflected in the stories themselves. Maybe the writer of that erotic scene hasn’t had sex with a girl yet, but damn, she has thought about it a lot. That queer author writes two girls falling in love even if they’re straight in the original work because two girls falling in love means something to her and to so many people like her, and it’s important that she sees herself in a piece of media whose canon forgets she exists. One of the great frustrations of LGBTQ media is the fact that so little of our representations end up coming from LGBTQ-identified creators, and thus we see inaccurate portrayals with limited diversity. Femslash exists because we were sick of being told we didn’t exist, so we wrote ourselves into their stories.”
    excerpt from a very long piece I’ve been working on for autostraddle about femslash and why there’s so little of it (and why we need to make more of it NOW)

    (Source: teenboypopstar, via jadelyn)

    femslash is the best

  11. thegreenwolf:

    bryxhearsxmusic:

    sizvideos:

    Watch it in video

    Follow our Tumblr

    ok but I just really love the names they give them

    "The Ridiculous Potato"

    "The Unfortunate Clementine"

    I’m giggling it’s like a team of ragtag misfit superheroes

    I love the sometimes absolutely ugly but completely tasty produce that comes out of my garden.

    (via jadelyn)