1. 

Photo taken during a lightning storm at 2am (It was pitch-black outside and lightning flashed, right as the picture was taken.)

    Photo taken during a lightning storm at 2am (It was pitch-black outside and lightning flashed, right as the picture was taken.)

    (Source: lvndscapes, via neornithes)

  2. medievalpoc:

thefrozenhedgehog:

lascasbookshelf:

FREE BOOK!
Slavery and the English Country House
Madge Dresser and Andrew Hann (eds.)English Heritage, 2013
Download PDF
more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com
||| Publisher’s blurb ||| 
The British country house has long been regarded as the jewel in the nation’s heritage crown. But the country house is also an expression of wealth and power, and as scholars reconsider the nation’s colonial past, new questions are being posed about these great houses and their links to Atlantic slavery.
This book, authored by a range of academics and heritage professionals, grew out of a 2009 conference on ‘Slavery and the British Country house: mapping the current research’ organised by English Heritage in partnership with the University of the West of England, the National Trust and the Economic History Society. It asks what links might be established between the wealth derived from slavery and the British country house and what implications such links should have for the way such properties are represented to the public today.In order to improve access to this research, a complete copy of the text is free to download from the left hand side of this page.
more from English Heritage
||| Contents |||
Read More

Here is a link  to a fantastic database created at UCL of the legacies of British Slave-Ownership, the buildings, collections, institutions, businesses, and families funded by slavery. You can search individuals, firms, and locations to find links to slave-ownership (eg. David Cameron’s ancestry). Browse physical, cultural, historical, imperial, commercial legacies, which include the British Museum and the National Gallery (many benefactors owned slaves). It sources the records of compensation claimed by slave owners for releasing slaves when slavery was abolished. There is also a blog running and various items of interest picked out. It’s a really good and important resource that hits home how much this country was built on the work of slaves.

reblog for the additional resource!

    medievalpoc:

    thefrozenhedgehog:

    lascasbookshelf:

    FREE BOOK!

    Slavery and the English Country House

    Madge Dresser and Andrew Hann (eds.)
    English Heritage, 2013

    Download PDF

    more FREE BOOKS from lascasbookshelf.tumblr.com

    ||| Publisher’s blurb ||| 

    The British country house has long been regarded as the jewel in the nation’s heritage crown. But the country house is also an expression of wealth and power, and as scholars reconsider the nation’s colonial past, new questions are being posed about these great houses and their links to Atlantic slavery.

    This book, authored by a range of academics and heritage professionals, grew out of a 2009 conference on ‘Slavery and the British Country house: mapping the current research’ organised by English Heritage in partnership with the University of the West of England, the National Trust and the Economic History Society. It asks what links might be established between the wealth derived from slavery and the British country house and what implications such links should have for the way such properties are represented to the public today.

    In order to improve access to this research, a complete copy of the text is free to download from the left hand side of this page.

    more from English Heritage

    ||| Contents |||

    Read More

    Here is a link  to a fantastic database created at UCL of the legacies of British Slave-Ownership, the buildings, collections, institutions, businesses, and families funded by slavery. You can search individuals, firms, and locations to find links to slave-ownership (eg. David Cameron’s ancestry). Browse physical, cultural, historical, imperial, commercial legacies, which include the British Museum and the National Gallery (many benefactors owned slaves). It sources the records of compensation claimed by slave owners for releasing slaves when slavery was abolished. There is also a blog running and various items of interest picked out. It’s a really good and important resource that hits home how much this country was built on the work of slaves.

    reblog for the additional resource!

  3. allthingslinguistic:

    October 9 was Hangul Day, a day celebrating the invention of the Korean alphabet. All writing systems are cool, but the Korean alphabet is a special favourite of linguists because the symbols are designed based on the phonetic features of their sounds. For example, from Wikipedia

    ㄱ g [k], ㅋ k [kʰ]
    Basic shape: ㄱ is a side view of the back of the tongue raised toward the velum (soft palate). (For illustration, access the external link below.) ㅋ is derived from ㄱ with a stroke for the burst of aspiration.
    ㄴ n [n], ㄷ d [t], ㅌ t [tʰ], ㄹ r [ɾ, l]
    Basic shape: ㄴ is a side view of the tip of the tongue raised toward the alveolar ridge (gum ridge). The letters derived from ㄴ are pronounced with the same basic articulation. The line topping ㄷ represents firm contact with the roof of the mouth. The middle stroke of ㅌ represents the burst of aspiration. The top of ㄹ represents a flap of the tongue.

    As this video from the late linguist Jim McCawley points out, this means that King Sejong and his scholars had a very modern understanding of articulatory phonetics and the phonology of Korean way back in the 1400s, and a sense of how important it was to design a system that was easy to learn so that everyone could be literate. 

    The individual sounds are then combined into syllable blocks. For example, here’s the word “hangul” itself: 

    For more information, Wikipedia is a good place to start, and there’s also a video series about learning Hangul

  4. dear 98% of the people that follow me that dont talk to me

    anerdyfeminist:

    syupon:

    tamaraldbrennan:

    Who are you

    Whats your favorite color

    Favorite ship

    Favorite ice cream flavor

    Do you have a cat

    Thank

    reblogging again bc I already got some from really cute people, but it makes me unreasonably happy to read these from you SO KEEP ON SENDING THEM 

    Please talk to me :)

    (Source: 314eater, via neornithes)

  5. explore-blog:

    Vox digs up Carl Sagan's evisceration of the logic behind America's anti-drug policy, in which Sagan applies the tenets of his famous Baloney Detection Kit to poke holes in the government’s half-baked rationale.

    Also see Aldous Huxley on drugs and democracy

    (via thedragoninmygarage)

  6. "All right then... Harrison, set a course for adventure." // Captain Marvel #8

    (Source: tchalla, via fandomsandwich)

  7. “I survived because the fire inside me burned brighter than the fire around me.”
    Joshua Graham (via outdoor-anarchy)

    (via onyxthemun)

  8. accumulatio-artemis:

    PIX OF NICKI ROCKIN MY AESTHETIC

    (Source: zolanskis, via katyismarvellous)

  9. fouriestseries:

    Curves of Constant Width and Odd-Sided Reuleaux Polygons

    A curve of constant width is a convex, two-dimensional shape that, when rotated inside a square, always makes contact with all four sides.

    A circle is the most obvious (but somewhat trivial) example. Some non-trivial examples are the odd-sided Reuleaux polygons — the first four of which are shown above.

    Since they don’t have fixed axes of rotation, curves of constant width (except the circle) have few practical applications. One notable use of the Reuleaux triangle, though, is in drilling holes in the shape of a slightly rounded square (watch one of the triangle’s vertices and notice the shape it traces out as it spins).

    On a less technical note, all curves of constant width are solutions to the brainteaser, “Other than a circle, what shape can you make a manhole cover such that it can’t fall through the hole it covers?”

    Mathematica code posted here.

    Additional source not linked above.

    (via visualizingmath)

    • questions to ask on a first date: what do you think the A in LGBTQA stands for?
  10. toushindai:


transparent ghost sticky notes help you make notes without defacing a book
[source] [h/t: misanthrobot]

I can attest that these are great.

    toushindai:

    transparent ghost sticky notes help you make notes without defacing a book

    [source] [h/t: misanthrobot]

    I can attest that these are great.

    (Source: nothxpls, via jadelyn)

  11. unamusedsloth:

"We should eat whatever those things are." [via]

    unamusedsloth:

    "We should eat whatever those things are." [via]

    (via notsoscairdycat)

  12. siddharthasmama:

    illbegotdamn:

    darvinasafo:

    Jim Crow 2.0

    nothing’s changed. it’s just evolved.

    devil stay pulling tricks.

    nothing changed but the date on the headlines

    (via jadelyn)